One-Legged Boy Can Finally Perform Skateboard Tricks After Receiving Prosthetic Leg

This one-legged teenager who dreamed of becoming a skateboarding star can now finally perform tricks – after receiving his first prosthetic leg.

Alrey Codilla Toring, 13, was born without a right foot and his lower leg not was not properly former due to a congenital defect.

He needed a crutch to walk and was teased by classmates who branded him ”disabled” and bullied him by hiding his pens during his classes at his school in Iligan City, Philippines.

But after his mother walked out on the family last year, Alrey persuaded his father to let him have a skateboard, like his friends had.

Despite his dad’s concerns about him being injured, Alrey was given a board and practiced by kneeling down and balancing with one leg.

He finally received a prosthetic limb in August, and now just two months later, the teenager can whizz around the ramps, grind rails, and jump down steps at his local skatepark.

Alrey has even won a local skating competition against other able-bodied youngsters, silencing the bullies and turning him into a hero in his home town.

Alrey said: ”I only had my prosthetic leg in August, that’s when I really started skating. My friends helped me learn. They told me I can be famous if I try harder. This is my talent.

”People used to tease me that I only have one leg, that I am disabled. My classmates also used to bully me, hide my pens, but not anymore.”

Alrey was given the plastic right leg by the government hospital in his home town of Saray. He covered his right ‘stump’ in several pairs of thick socks which he then slips inside the false leg. His skateboarding trainers are attached to the end of his new limb.

Since receiving his prosthetic leg, Alrey is able to ‘drop in’ to the concrete ramps, board slide on the hand rails, and ollie down steps and 3ft high blocks.

He’s dreaming of turning his passion into a full-time career, and has encouraged all of his friends to take up skateboarding as it keeps them away from the country’s notorious drugs gangs.

Alrey added: ”It’s still hard to skate because I have to keep up with the board movements. On my first try, I fell so much but I got the hang of it with practice. Support from my friends helped me improve a lot.

”They taught me skating tricks and how to ‘drop-in’. Of course I fell at first. But I managed to learn.

”I have won a few competitions. I also fail to win in some, but in Cagayan de Oro I won.

My mother already left us She broke up with my father, she went to the city. I told my father I wanted to learn how to skateboard. My father was worried but he gave me a skateboard. I want my father to be proud of me. I also won some prize money. I know my father is happy that I get to share it with my family.

”I think skateboarding is worth my time, more than having bad vices. Bad vices will ruin you, but skateboarding gives me happiness. I’m really happy to do this.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *